NHS and Hinchinbrooke Hospital

Huntingdon Labour’s new NHS officer, Rob Gardiner, is active in the campaign to save Hinchingbrooke Hospital. Scroll down for notes of the latest meeting on 3rd Oct.

Rob Gardiner has alerted us to public meetings about the merger – Oct 12 as above and Oct 13th St Ives

https://www.peterboroughandstamford.nhs.uk/about-us/trust-news/hospital-trusts-publish-full-business-case-for-proposed-merger/

Q&A ON POTENTIAL HOSPITAL MERGER 12 OCTOBER

Members of the public are invited to attend and, if they wish to, participate in a Special Meeting of the Overview and Scrutiny Panel (Communities and Environment) at which the potential merger of Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust with Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust will be discussed.  This will include the opportunity to hear directly from Lance McCarthy, Chief Executive of the Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, as well as the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clincial Commissioning Group. The meeting is to be held on Wednesday 12 October, 7pm in the Civic Suite at Pathfinder House, St Mary’s Street, Huntingdon, PE29 3TN.

The Trusts running Hinchingbrooke Hospital and Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals have recently approved a full business case for merger implementation on 1 April 2017, subject to the output of further staff and public engagement and an independent review. At their November Board meetings, both Boards expect to ratify the decision to merge having reviewed these additional inputs.

During the Special Meeting, half an hour will be allocated for members of the public to comment on the merger proposals. To help manage this process, we are asking for people to register their interest in participating in advance, which will be by making a statement of up to 3 minutes in length. Speakers will be taken in the order in which their interest has been registered.

Councillor Tim Alban, Chairman of the Overview and Scrutiny (Communities and Environment) Panel, said: “Hinchingbrooke Hospital continues to play a huge part in the life of the people of Huntingdonshire and the Panel welcomes comments from local residents to help us make an informed response to the proposals for its future.” For further information, or to register your interest in asking a question on the night, please email Adam Green in the Corporate Team at Huntingdonshire District Council at adam.green@huntingdonshire.gov.uk.

Donna RockettCommunications OfficerCorporate TeamHuntingdonshire District CouncilTel: 01480 388239www.huntingdonshire.gov.uk

LATEST PUBLIC MEETING NOTES

Meeting held at Hinchingbrooke Hospital, on 03.10.16

Attended: Lance McCarthy CEO Hinchingbrooke Hospital Health Care Trust

Stephen Graves CEO Peterborough and Stamford Health Foundation Trust

2 other hospital managers (not identified by name)

30 members of the public

McCarthy repeated his usual presentation, repeating many of the same points as previously. However, he did confirm that the Full Business Case(FBC) had now been sanctioned and agreed by both Hospital Boards. These decisions would now have to gain the approval of the Independent Clinical Senate, which is a regional body that oversees the East of England. Their validity was also dependent on seeking the support of the public and of staff, with a process of continued engagement with these 2 stakeholders, which would take the form of a series of scheduled meetings.  The final decision regarding the FBC will occur in late November.

McCarthy referred to several factors that had influenced the decision to approve the FBC. Firstly, the problems created by the existence of smaller medical teams at Hinchingbrooke; the agency spending caps currently in situ; the requirement to implement a 7-day service; and the moving over to the new junior doctors’ contract. He then detailed specific clinical services that demanded change. He again alluded to Haematology, and the difficulty of recruiting a consultant for that Department. He then continued to highlight the fact of Hinchingbrooke being a smaller hospital, which made it consequentially problematic to recruit medical staff.

He then turned to the financial case. The acquisition will save 9 million annually, with one off transition costs of 13 million.

McCarthy spoke of the risks created the acquisition. The Boards may have been too optimistic in their financial projections; the Boards may fail to engage with the public and hospital staff; the due diligence process may find flaws in the FBC.

As to the FBC the regulator, namely NHS Improvement, must sign it off, through its Governance programme. There is presently work being conducted with identified fragile clinical services. Also early collaboration between the 2 Hospitals is being initiated. And further development of the clinical case for the “merger” is being conducted.

He then went on to describe the next steps. They are seeking a new name for the new organisation and want the public to make suggestions. There will be a new Board, if “merger” is proceeded with, composed of representatives from the 3 geographical areas, namely Huntingdon, Peterborough, and Stamford, who will be elected as governors by the public. This electorate will be composed of signed up members of the new Trust.

The presentation concluded and the meeting was opened up for questions.

Questions

  1. A health professional pointed out the dubious history of mergers, with many of these proving unsuccessful. Indeed, mergers have been used in the past as a means to asset strip hospitals who have participated in such mergers. In response McCarthy did refer to the Kings Fund Report of 2015, which provided a damning critique of the 20 mergers it studied. He argued the Boards had learnt lessons from the mistakes made in these previous efforts. He argued that these particular mergers had been implemented for purely financial reasons, whereas this merger was being driven by clinical issues. He alluded to several mergers he deemed successful, including Frimley Park, Royal Free, York, and Scarborough. He then referred to an alternative study, conducted by the Cass Business School, which involved 4 mergers. He stated this report had concluded that these mergers had been successful. I joined in this discussion, first to clarify and identify his references, and secondly to argue that the Kings Fund Report had found that the mergers they had studied did not solve the clinical issues they had sought to address.
  2. Someone asked if attention had been paid to the current projections of the growth in the local population and what effect this “merger” might have on the capacity to cope with the health needs of Huntingdonshire. McCarthy declared the Board had looked at this issue. , particularly in terms of the future needs of the over 65 s. He then alluded to the Health Campus as part of the solution, with it representing an amalgamation of services.  This development would comprise of several elements, a nursing home, a residential care facility, a base for health support for the local population, flats to be sold to the public, and staff accommodation. There would be a Strategic Estates Partnership with a private firm, in ord4r to accomplish the above plan. The NHS will provide the land and the staff as their contribution. It is projected that the Trust will gain an income stream of 5 million on an annual basis. He affirmed this was not a PFI scheme.  He informed us that the Trust would be involved in purchasing the land required. He further admitted that the full figure of 5 million would not be available till 2019/2020.
  3. A member of the audience spoke of the knock on effect of Hinchingbrooke’s reputation, acquired through its past involvement with Circle, which then impacted on its ability to attract staff. McCarthy believed the fact that Hinchingbrooke had been placed in Special Measures had been more of a factor in being able to recruit staff. It was also pointed out that there were benefits for professionals in having the opportunity to work in smaller organisations. McCarthy still thought that size was a negative factor in Hinchingbrooke’s case.
  4. A question was put about the historical links with Addenbrookes and whether the latter would have been a better partner for Hinchingbrooke to ally itself with. Graves, who had worked at Addenbrookes in the past, informed the meeting that Addenbrookes had decided not to bid for the Hinchingbrooke franchise in the past. In his opinion Peterborough, through its ethos and comparable functions as a medium sized district general hospital, shared similarities that made them suitable partners. Addenbrookes would continue to act as a tertiary service, within the Cambridgeshire health economy. McCarthy commented that the case mix was not large enough to attract medical staff., and that the critical mass gained via the “merger “would allow the opportunity to develop sub specialities.
  1. A question concerning the Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP) was asked, and the language used in it when referring to a commitment to support the continuance of urgent care at Hinchingbrooke. The words “expects”, “should”, and “would” have been used in documents seen by the member of the audience. Both Graves and McCarthy denied this was the case and spoke of the guarantees they had received from Tracy Dowling, the Accountable Officer for the   Clinical Commissioning Group. I pointed out the revelations made public by the Guardian and 38 Degrees investigation, which had discovered the plans to close district general hospitals. Graves ridiculed this argument, asking where would all the patients go if they took such a decision.
  2. Someone queried the loss involved in the absence of local senior management from the Hinchingbrooke site. Through this “merger” we would lose a local board, a Chief Executive, with no one strategically responsible for the hospital on the site. McCarthy defended this point by asserting there would be various managers on site. McCarthy asserted that there would be various managers on site. However, he admitted that the Accountable Officer would be the CEO based at Peterborough Hospital and it was he that the CQC would have to deal with finally.
  3. He was again asked if he had a back-up plan, a Plan B, and he again answered No. He insisted they had already chosen the best option.
  4. Someone asked about the rumours and myths swirling about and wondered how these could be dealt with or even stopped at source. McCarthy expressed the hope that holding engagement meetings and attending Scrutiny Committees would help to arrest this phenomenon. He also advised people to read the Summary version of the FBC, with the original comprising 150 pages. The Summary is composed of 10-12 pages and is written in plain English.

I asked for an update on the number of redundancies they now expected as a result of the Acquisition. At the stage of the Outline Business Case the figure estimated was 70. The number has doubled to 140, though it was stressed that this referred to posts, with some of these being currently unfilled.

Rob Gardiner 7 Oct 2016

Addendum        

I was left with some unanswered questions I was unable to ask at the Meeting.

I will research the Cass Business Study, but I doubt that this body can contest the clear findings of the Kings Fund, which is recognised as independent and authorative in relation to its reports. And it cannot be denied the Kings Fund in 2015 recommended that mergers were not the answer and in their words advised “place based systems of care, with emphasis on collaboration across organisational and service boundaries, in order to meet the needs of a defined population, so as to ensure financial and clinical sustainability”. In other words, the aim is to achieve an Integrated Health Care System, Involving primary care, hospital and older peoples’ care.

The FBC states that “changes in the future as to how these services are designed and delivered may happen as a result of other commissioning work. If STP decides on significant changes- proposed by the CCG- they would be subject to public consultation”. I couple this statement with the ambiguous language used in the Draft document produced by the CCG.

Statements were made that the final decision was dependent on gaining the support/engagement of the public and of the staff. How is this to be judged, by what criteria?

Q&A ON POTENTIAL HOSPITAL MERGER 12 OCTOBER

Members of the public are invited to attend and, if they wish to, participate in a Special Meeting of the Overview and Scrutiny Panel (Communities and Environment) at which the potential merger of Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust with Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust will be discussed.  This will include the opportunity to hear directly from Lance McCarthy, Chief Executive of the Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust, as well as the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clincial Commissioning Group. The meeting is to be held on Wednesday 12 October, 7pm in the Civic Suite at Pathfinder House, St Mary’s Street, Huntingdon, PE29 3TN.

The Trusts running Hinchingbrooke Hospital and Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals have recently approved a full business case for merger implementation on 1 April 2017, subject to the output of further staff and public engagement and an independent review. At their November Board meetings, both Boards expect to ratify the decision to merge having reviewed these additional inputs.

During the Special Meeting, half an hour will be allocated for members of the public to comment on the merger proposals. To help manage this process, we are asking for people to register their interest in participating in advance, which will be by making a statement of up to 3 minutes in length. Speakers will be taken in the order in which their interest has been registered.

Councillor Tim Alban, Chairman of the Overview and Scrutiny (Communities and Environment) Panel, said: “Hinchingbrooke Hospital continues to play a huge part in the life of the people of Huntingdonshire and the Panel welcomes comments from local residents to help us make an informed response to the proposals for its future.” For further information, or to register your interest in asking a question on the night, please email Adam Green in the Corporate Team at Huntingdonshire District Council at adam.green@huntingdonshire.gov.uk.

Donna RockettCommunications OfficerCorporate TeamHuntingdonshire District CouncilTel: 01480 388239www.huntingdonshire.gov.uk

Rob Gardiner has alerted us to public meetings about the merger – Oct 12 as above and Oct 13th St Ives

https://www.peterboroughandstamford.nhs.uk/about-us/trust-news/hospital-trusts-publish-full-business-case-for-proposed-merger/

Rob Gardiner’s report on the Save Hinchingbooke campaign – Sept 2016

Following Rob’s appointment as our NHS Officer in May he submitted this report on the Hinchinbrooke Hospital Merger public meeting which took place this summer, for our monthly CLP meeting on Monday 26th Sept at the Medway Centre.

rob-g-report

Save Hinchingbrooke Hospital – sign the petition in the link!

https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/save-hinchingbrooke-hospital?source=twitter-share-button

DL

Daniel Laycock

Campaign created by
Daniel Laycock
2,068
of 3,000 signatures


To: Prime Minister, NHS Improvement, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commission Group

We, the undersigned, wish to see Hinchingbrooke Hospital retained as a District General Hospital for Huntingdonshire and the extended area, retaining all of the clinical services it currently provides on a clinically and financially viable basis, to be publicly provided publicly funded and publicly accountable.

We, the undersigned, also wish to see the Non-Executive Hospital Board changed with immediate effect, so as to have a Board made up of residents’ from the Huntingdonshire area that is representative of the local population. Change in the make-up of the Hinchingbrooke Hospital Board will be in line with the Government’s commitment to devolve power to local communities.

Why is this important?

The future of Hinchingbrooke Hospital is under threat and the proposed merger with Peterborough and Stamford Foundation NHS Trust may see the closure of Accident & Emergency, Maternity and Haematology and also the downgrading of the hospital. We will fight for the retainment of Hinchingbrooke Hospital.

Hinchingbrooke Hospital currently provides medical and emergency care for 160,000 residents in Huntingdon and the surrounding rural area. Further housing stock has been planned and approved for development in the near future, which will increase the need to have a District Hospital in Huntingdon.
Peterborough and Addenbrookes, the two nearest alternative hospitals are 40 minutes journey time at best, along very busy roads assuming you have your own transport. Not ideal if you are very unwell. We will fight to save Hinchingbrooke.

Hospital Boss to be Scrutinised by Council and Public

FILER

Huntingdonshire District Council will be holding a special meeting on Tuesday 28th June, 7pm at Pathfinder House where CEO of Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Lance McCarty and Val Moore from Healthwatch Cambridgeshire will be scrutinised and quizzed by Councillors and the public on the proposed merger with Peterborough and Stamford Foundation NHS Trust.

Hands Off Hinchingbrooke will be attending the special meeting and scrutinising Mr McMarthy on the merger and what future does the hospital have after 1 April, 2017.

If you’re unable to attend and  you would like to ask Lance MaCarthy a question then email Adam.green@huntingdonshire.gov.uk or alternativley if you would like us to ask a question on your behalf, then please email us info@handsoffhinchingbrooke.org

The NHS is at risk as never before due to the merciless cuts and privatisation visited on it by the Conservative Government. Nowhere more starkly seen than in the treatment of Hinchinbrooke Hospital, the only General NHS Hospital to have been run and then unceremoniously dumped by a private firm, Circle. On April 30th 2016 30 Labour members joined some 200* protesters on a march from Huntingdon Riverside to Hinchinbrooke to defend Hinchinbrooke Hospital services and celebrate the NHS. Dr Nik Johnson spoke with authority and conviction, drawing hearty applause from the audience of Hinchinbrooke supporters and staff. MP Jonathan Djanogly received a more cautious reception, and did not respond to Nik’s challenge for him to resign and fight Huntingdon as an independent if he truly meant to support Hinchinbrooke Hospital.

*more than 400, says BBC News

Pictured: On left MP Jonathan Djanogly, on right Labour vice-chair and council candidate Dr Nik Johnson preparing his speech.

nik djanogly banner hinch

Below: Councillor Patrick Kadewere (right) and Labour supporters of Hinchinbrooke Hospital

patrick and hands off hinch colleagues

 

 

 

img_8679img_8680Davi Dameron'sNHS gp_wait trust ScreenHunter_74 Feb. 23 14.26 trolleysroken promises trust UKIP NHS

See Nik’s letter about Hinchinbrooke to the Hunts Post

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